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  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 2023/01/24 at 11:00 AM (MST)

    Flocculants are powerful tools that have been used for decades to control erosion, stabilize soil, and remove harmful contaminants from water. Flocculant treatments can meet very low discharge limits, allowing sites to stay in compliance, meet regulations and improve stormwater quality and clarity. Applied Polymer Systems introduced flocculants to the erosion and stormwater industries in the 1990s, drawing from decades of research and use in mining effluent treatment. Anionic polyacrylamide is the most widely accepted and commonly used flocculant due to being both safe for aquatic life, and highly effective.

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    LET'S TALK FLOC
    A flocculant webinar from the company that brought
    flocculant (Floc) Logs and Polymer Enhanced BMPs to the industry


    FREE EVENT

    Presenter: Seva Iwinski, Vice President, Applied Polymer Systems

    Flocculants are powerful tools that have been used for decades to control erosion, stabilize soil, and remove harmful contaminants from water. Flocculant treatments can meet very low discharge limits, allowing sites to stay in compliance, meet regulations and improve stormwater quality and clarity.  Applied Polymer Systems introduced flocculants to the erosion and stormwater industries in the 1990s, drawing from decades of research and use in mining effluent treatment. Anionic polyacrylamide is the most widely accepted and commonly used flocculant due to being both safe for aquatic life, and highly effective.

    Thanks to years of education and concerted effort by universities, companies, and organizations like the IECA, flocculant use has evolved from sparse use of what many deemed mysterious “fairy dust”, to widespread adoption and a push towards standardized flocculant training, use and application. With many states recently adopting, preparing to adopt, or considering adopting anionic polyacrylamide into their toolboxes (i.e. pre-approved flocculant lists, QPLs/APLS, or erosion control and stormwater manuals) interest in flocculants and demand for training and information has reached levels never seen before in our industry.  Despite expanded use and interest, confusion and questions still exist, and education is needed to ensure flocculants are used safely and effectively. Join Applied Polymer Systems, the company who brought flocculant technologies to this industry 25 years ago, as we cover how to effectively, safely, and efficiently use flocculants to enhance traditional best management practices to meet stormwater and erosion and sediment control goals and requirements.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  

    1. Understanding the basics of flocculant technologies and how to select safe and effective flocculants for treatment systems
    2. Understand what anionic polyacrylamide is, how it works, and why it is the standard flocculant used for erosion and sediment control and stormwater treatment in the industry
    3. Gain a basic knowledge and understanding of the steps needed to apply, maintain, and troubleshoot flocculants in field applications
    4. Recognize how traditional BMPs may be enhanced using anionic PAM to improve sediment control and water treatment 

    Sponsored by:

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    Hosted by:

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    Seva Iwinski Bray

    Vice President

    Applied Polymer Systems

    Seva Iwinski Bray is an environmental scientist, Vice President of Applied Polymer Systems, and a co-founder of IY Progen Systems. She has over 15 years of experience in erosion and sediment control and stormwater management utilizing flocculant treatments. She holds a BS in Bioenvironmental Science from Texas A&M University. Her most common industry roles include technical training to educate companies, agencies, engineers, and other industry professionals on flocculant treatments that are safe for use in the open environment as well as assisting in continual research and advancements for polymers in E&SC and water clarification.

    This webinar is worth One (1) Professional Development Hour. 

    • Register
      • Non member - Free!
      • Professional member - Free!
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - Free!
      • Young Professional member - Free!
      • Emeritus member - Free!
      • Discounted Professional member - Free!
      • Australia Member - Free!
      • Australia Non-Member - Free!
    • More Information
  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 2022/12/07

    This webinar presents the various needs for grade control measures, the types of grade control structures, how these structures dissipate the water’s energy, their pros and cons, and also presents “low head” grade control structures often used in stream restoration projects.

    Two Part Series
    Grade Control and Energy Dissipation - Maintaining Natural Channel Bed Stability

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    On-Demand

    Part 1 - Presented by: David Williams

    Part 2 - Presented by: Chris Estes

    Natural and human activities can cause unstable changes in stream channel slope. Natural stable stream channels utilize riffle pool sequencing to armor against erosion and dissipate energy. Riffles armor the bed from swift flows while pools dissipate the energy and slow the flow. This is called dynamic equilibrium which can take centuries to evolve. When man made activities interrupt this sequence, a chain reaction begins. Slope change in stable streams can most often result in channel incision when bedrock or similar control is not present. The end result is a streambed and base flow that is significantly lower than its natural floodplain. This in turn produces bank erosion, collapse and deposition when the deeper channel is forced to convey larger storms.

    Engineered grade control measures are typically used to mitigate this interruption in stability. Grade control structures can be composed of a variety of materials and configurations such as rock, wood and earth structures placed across the channel and anchored in the streambanks. We have learned to design like nature, mimicking natural conditions and processes, like bedrock outcrops, felled trees, riffles and pools.

    Part one of this two part webinar presents typical examples where grade control measures are required, the types of grade control structures, how these structures dissipate the water’s energy, their pros and cons. Part two presents research and practice of pool design for culvert outlets, erosion control and aquatic passage.

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    Hosted by:

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    David Williams

    Dr. David Williams, PE, CFM, PH, CPESC, the president of DTW and Associates, has over 35 years of experience in the water resources industry and is known nationally and internationally for his contributions to the industry. He is well versed in the widely used computer programs HEC-1, HEC-HMS, HEC-2, HEC-RAS, HEC-6, STORM, and WQRRS. Dr. Williams is also a nationally recognized expert in sedimentation engineering, streambank protection, stream restoration, erosion control and in developing innovative solutions to difficult hydraulic and hydrologic design problems in rivers and estuaries.

    Chris J. Estes, North Carolina, RLA, GC

    President

    Chris Estes is president of Estes Design, Inc., & owner manager of Anglesy Construction companies in Charlotte NC that specialize in Low Impact Development design & construction, storm water quality, and environmental regulatory services

    Mr. Estes has conducted and published hydraulic research in peer review publications such as the Journal of American Water Resource Association and industry publications including Stormwater Magazine. He initiated four UNC Charlotte graduate research projects, and another which he conducted and co-authored. He has been a contributor to several books including the engineering Guide to LEED New Construction. Mr. Estes has developed patents in CO2 sequestration and continues to look for ways to learn and advocate for sustainable practices

    Mr. Estes designed and researched the first multi-family pervious concrete (PC) parking system in NC and the first private and public (PC) lots in Kentucky. Mr. Estes assisted North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources revise Chapter 18 of the NC BMP Manual, “Permeable Pavement” and continues to work with regulatory commissions to revise and update Low Impact Development standards


    Ryan Alltop (Moderator)

    Encap Inc.

    You will receive 2 Professional Development Hour per session in this Webinar Series. You have the option to listen to as many presentations as you wish, however you will only receive education credit for the presentations you attended.

    • Register
      • Non member - $40
      • Professional member - $15
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - $15
      • Young Professional member - $15
      • Emeritus member - $15
      • Discounted Professional member - $15
      • Australia Member - $15
      • Australia Non-Member - $40
    • More Information
  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation gives an understanding of what the Infrastructure Sustainability Council is, what makes up the ISC scoring and how the ESC industry can be involved and contribute to increased sustainability practices within their business, services and products.

    Infrastructure Sustainability Council Rating Scheme, Tools and
    Sustainable ESC

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    Wednesday, November 23, 2022 - 9:30AM Sydney Time

    The Infrastructure Sustainability Council (IS Council)  is a member-based, purpose-led peak/industry body operating in Australia and New Zealand to enable sustainability outcomes in infrastructure. The IS Rating Scheme (IS) is Australia and New Zealand’s only comprehensive rating system for evaluating economic, social and environmental performance of infrastructure across the planning, design, construction and operational phases of infrastructure assets. Within the various themes of the ratings framework, there are numerous criteria where drainage, erosion and sediment control practices and products are assessed and form part of the overarching final score.

    This presentation gives an understanding of what the Infrastructure Sustainability Council is, what makes up the ISC scoring and how the ESC industry can be involved and contribute to increased sustainability practices within their business, services and products.

    Presented By: Dallas Frazier

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    Dallas Frazier

    Environment Manager

    Fulton Hogan

    Dallas is the Environmental Manager for the Fulton Hogan and has a demonstrated history of working in the construction industry. He is a strong community and social services professional skilled in Environmental Issues, Erosion and Sediment Control, ISCA requirements, Biodiversity, Environmental Auditing, Environmental Awareness, and Construction

    Asim Nizam

    Senior Project manager

    Infrastructure Sustainability Council

    Asim Nizam joined the Infrastructure Sustainability Council in April 2021 as a Senior Project Manager and is currently the Regional Lead for the New South Wales market. With a Bachelors in Environmental Engineering and Masters in Environmental and Business Management, Asim has over 12 years experience in sustainability reporting, environmental data management, carbon accounting and green infrastructure project management.

    This webinar is worth One (1) Professional Development Hour. 

    • Register
      • Non member - $40
      • Professional member - $15
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - $15
      • Young Professional member - $15
      • Emeritus member - $15
      • Discounted Professional member - $15
      • Australia Member - $15
      • Australia Non-Member - $40
    • More Information
  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Members Only Benefit: IECA offers 1 PDH credit for members that complete the Environmental Connection Magazine Content Quiz.

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    IECA members have the opportunity to earn one (1) Professional Development Hour per Environmental Connection Magazine (4 per year) by completing the quarterly Environmental Connection Magazine Quiz. You're already reading Environmental Connection, so why not get the extra credits? For a digital copy of the current issue, please visit: http://www.ieca.org/archives 

    This quiz is for the 4th Quarter 2022 edition. Once you have read the entire magazine, complete the quiz with a 70% or better to receive your credit.

    At the completion of this quiz you will receive 1 Professional Development Hour of credit. For any questions on continuing education credit, please contact IECA Education at education@ieca.org

    • Register
      • Professional member - Free!
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - Free!
      • Young Professional member - Free!
      • Emeritus member - Free!
      • Discounted Professional member - Free!
      • Australia Member - Free!
    • More Information
  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation will be an overview of US EPA’s Trash Free Waters (TFW) program, including program goals, TFW’s role in helping implement provisions in the Save Our Seas 2.0 Act of 2020, and a description of recently completed or active program projects.

    US EPA | Trash Free Waters

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    On-Demand

    This presentation will be an overview of US EPA’s Trash Free Waters (TFW) program, including program goals, TFW’s role in helping implement provisions in the Save Our Seas 2.0 Act of 2020, and a description of recently completed or active program projects.

    Most of the trash that pollutes our rivers, lakes, estuaries, and oceans comes from sources on land. Plastic trash, in particular, threatens human health, aquatic ecosystems, and the economy. EPA’s Trash Free Waters program is reducing the volume of trash entering our waters by working with partners to implement collaborative solutions that target land-based sources.

    Presented By: Romell Nandi

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    Presented by the IECA MS4 Education Committee

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    Romell Nandi

    US EPA

    Romell has been the US EPA’s Trash Free Waters national program lead, located within the Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, since 2018. In that role, Romell has been a key leader in the Agency’s efforts to address the problem of marine litter, but also in its efforts to address trash loadings into domestic freshwater systems.

    Until recently, Romell had served with EPA’s National Estuary Program concurrently with his tenure as Trash Free Waters national program lead. Prior to his time with Trash Free Waters, he served as a Special Assistant to the Director for the Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, helping the Director with oversight on a large array of programs, both regulatory and voluntary, implemented by that office.

    Romell has also served with the Agency’s Wetlands program, leading the program’s state and tribal wetland program development and financing efforts and overseeing the program’s Wetland Program Development Grants. Furthermore, Romell served as a program expert within EPA’s Nonpoint Source program, authoring national programmatic and funding guidances, developing funding and technical assistance documents and forums, developing the program’s grants database, and performing the role of primary national expert on the nonpoint source grant program.

    Romell received his Bachelor of Arts from Bowdoin College, a Master of Science degree in Political Science from the University of Oregon, and a Master in Public Policy with a focus on Environment and Natural Resources from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.

    Dr. Scott Rogers, PE, CPMSM (Moderator)

    Environmental Coordination Engineer

    Alabama Department of Transportation

    Dr. Scott W. Rogers is the Environmental Coordination Engineer in the Design Bureau of the Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT). His service at ALDOT since 2010 has primarily consisted of coordinating the ongoing development of the ALDOT MS4 program among many ALDOT offices and communicating the outcomes of that program in various ways to other government agencies, the professional community, and the citizens of Alabama. Since assuming the role of Environmental Coordination Engineer in October 2017, he has participated in the coordination of ALDOT’s environmental activities more broadly. He is Chair of the MS4 Management Subcommittee of the IECA Education Committee and is on the board of directors of the Alabama Stormwater Association. Dr. Rogers holds a Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree from Auburn University in Auburn, AL, as well as M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, GA. He is a Professional Engineer in the State of Alabama and a Certified Professional in Municipal Stormwater Management.

    Courtenay Howell

    Environmental Compliance Inspector

    City of Bowling Green

    Courtenay Howell has been employed with the City of Bowling Green, KY since 2015 supporting the MS4’s compliance program by creating social media content, assisting in public education, outreach, and involvement activities, as well as coordinating the Kentucky Muddy Water Blues erosion and sediment control field days.  In 2020, Courtenay began her role as the City’s Environmental Compliance Inspector of construction site stormwater runoff.  She is on the Kentucky Stormwater Association board of directors and serves on the IECA MS4 Management Educational Track Committee.  Her love of nature and the significance of its preservation was fostered during her childhood on the rolling forested hills, sandstone cliffs and river bottoms of south-central Kentucky.

    Ashley Smith

    Environmental Specialist III

    Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services

    Ashley Smith is an Environmental Specialist III with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services (CMSWS). She leads the Public Education and Involvement programs, providing educational opportunities and volunteer activities to residents of all ages. She has been with CMSWS for six years. She has a passion for serving her community and for educating others about water quality. She has a B.S. in Meteorology and a Masters in Climate Change and Society from North Carolina State University.

    Maria Price

    City of Chattanooga

    Maria is a registered Professional Engineer in TN & VA with aB.S. in Civil & Environmental Engineering from Tennessee TechnologicalUniversity.   She has a diverse background in transmissionengineering, environmental & construction activities, utility projectmanagement, multi-discipline project management, and codeenforcement.  Maria has employment history with TVA, TDOT, several privatefirms and currently utilizes her talents for the City of Chattanooga as theStormwater Division Director and Engineering Manager for Public Works. She was named ASCE TN Section Government Engineer of the Year in 2017, received2020 Chattanooga Engineers’ Week People to People Award, is on the SoutheastStormwater Association board, is 1 of 2 TN Reps to the National StormwaterAssociation and is Chair of the TN ASCE Environmental & Water ResourcesInstitute (EWRI).  She is the Creator & Director of the ChattanoogaDevelopment Symposium and guest lecturer at the University of TN atChattanooga.

    When not working or involved in Girl Scouts or charity work, shespends time with her husband, 2 daughters & Australian Cattle Dog. She enjoys board games, off-roading, muscle cars, cooking, and geekingout about stormwater.

    This webinar is worth One (1) Professional Development Hour. 

    • Register
      • Non member - $40
      • Professional member - $15
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - $15
      • Young Professional member - $15
      • Emeritus member - $15
      • Discounted Professional member - $15
      • Australia Member - $15
      • Australia Non-Member - $40
    • More Information
  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will look at research into waste wool and hemp fiber in erosion and sediment control products. Research and innovation continue to push the industry forward, join us as we learn about research into the use of these materials in erosion and sediment control products.

    Innovation in Erosion and Sediment Control: Hemp Fiber and Sheep Wool

    This webinar will look at research into waste wool and hemp fiber in erosion and sediment control products. Research and innovation continue to push the industry forward, join us as we learn about research into the use of these materials in erosion and sediment control products. 

    Finding End Use Opportunities for Hemp Fiber: Erosion Control R&D Project Background & Update

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    Speaker: Riley Gordon Agriculture Utilization Research Institute 

    The Agricultural Utilization Research Institute's (AURI) mission is to foster long-term economic benefit for the state of Minnesota through value added agricultural products. AURI has been very active in the industrial hemp space, focusing on opportunities to facilitate commercialization of products, particularly in the areas of food and fiber. Leveraging awarded funding from Minnesota’s Environmental & Natural Resources Trust Fund, AURI has partnered with MNDOT, local hemp growers and several erosion control manufacturer partners to explore the use of industrial hemp fiber in several types of erosion and sediment control products. This presentation given by the project lead, Riley Gordon, PE, will give background and updates on the research projects goals, work done to date and next steps.

    Sheep Wool - The Super Fiber for Erosion and Sediment Control

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    Speaker: Brad Stuart, Terralana

    With ‘Sustainability’ at the heart of most projects these days, it makes sense to be looking for ways to reduce our environmental impact in everything we do.  Material choice can be challenging and with so many products available, choosing the best product for specific applications isn’t easy. Terra Lana will be exploring the possibilities of utilizing biodegradable materials on projects and how not all biodegradability is created equal.   This is a topical subject and an opportunity to challenge each other to work towards the common goal of regenerative design and a sustainable future.

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    Hosted by

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    Riley Gordon

    Engineer

    Agricultural Utilization Research Institute

    Riley Gordon graduated with honors from Brandon University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics (Mathematics minor) in the spring of 2014. Then, in 2017 he completed a degree program at the University of Minnesota—Twin Cities, obtaining a Bachelors degree in Civil Engineering with Environmental Emphasis in water related topics. Coinciding with his time at the U of M, Riley interned with a Civil Engineering consulting firm, working in both Intelligent Transportation Systems and Water Resources groups.

    As an engineer, Riley will be applying the skills he gained through both his education and related industry experience to assist in AURI’s broad range of projects and initiatives. He primarily works out of the Coproducts lab in Waseca, MN, but will also apply his skillsets by delving into projects related to all four of the focus areas that encompass AURI’s work.

    Riley is originally from Brandon, Manitoba, Canada.

    Brad Stuart

    National Sales and Specification Manager

    Terralana

    Brad Stuart is the National Specification Manager for Terra Lana Products Ltd.  With 18 years in the construction industry, he brings a love for natural materials along with his desire to educate and pioneer initiatives to assist architects and designers to integrate ‘best practice’ solutions.  He is passionate about wool products and is focused on collaborating with others in the industry to ensure a sustainable future for the generations to come.

    You will receive 1 Professional Development Hour for this webinar. 

    • Register
      • Non member - $40
      • Professional member - $15
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - $15
      • Young Professional member - $15
      • Emeritus member - $15
      • Discounted Professional member - $15
      • Australia Member - $15
      • Australia Non-Member - $40
    • More Information
  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 2022/09/22

    This presentation will cover the current status of flocculant usage in the U.S. for construction stormwater treatment and recap research findings on optimum dosage delivery requirements and residual concentration detection methods.​

    Flocculant Usage in Construction Stormwater Treatment

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    On-Demand

    Flocculants provide an innovative solution for managing construction stormwater runoff with their efficiency in reducing turbidity in the effluent.  With proper application and dosage, these chemicals improve the performance of sediment control practices in capturing fine-sized soil particles. Dosage, product selection, agitation, and application requirements of flocculants vary based on flocculant type and soil-dependent nature of the chemical agents. This presentation will cover the current status of flocculant usage in the U.S. for construction stormwater treatment and recap research findings on optimum dosage delivery requirements and residual concentration detection methods.

    Presented By: Billur Kazaz, Ph.D.

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    Presented by:

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    Platinum Event Sponsor:

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    Billur Kazaz,

    Senior Staff Professional

    Geosyntec Consultants

    Dr. Kazaz is a Senior Staff Professional at Geosyntec Consultants specializing in construction stormwater management. She recently earned her Ph.D. degree in civil engineering at Auburn University. She earned her M.S. in Civil Engineering degree at Iowa State University and B.S. in Civil Engineering at Istanbul Technical University. Dr. Kazaz’s doctoral research focused on construction stormwater management, including providing application and dosage guidance for the proper implementation of flocculants on job sites. Her research interests also included using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for construction stormwater inspections by integrating GIS, photogrammetry, and deep-learning-based object detection principles. Dr. Kazaz is an active member of the International Erosion Control Association (IECA) and she is a CPESC-IT.

    This webinar is worth One (1) Professional Development Hour. 

    • Register
      • Non member - $40
      • Professional member - $15
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - $15
      • Young Professional member - $15
      • Emeritus member - $15
      • Discounted Professional member - $15
      • Australia Member - $15
      • Australia Non-Member - $40
    • More Information
  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this webinar, presented by Storm Water Solutions and the International Erosion Control Association (IECA), participants will gain an understanding of how different modes of sediment control affect the discharge commitments and role of related weather impacts. Additionally, recognize how sediment control BMPs may fail to deliver permit requirements unless upgraded and amended as the work changes, and finally, integrate staged sediment control based on function into the work.

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    Nature-Based Approaches in Lake Michigan Coastal Restoration

    On-Demand

    In this on-demand webinar, presented by Storm Water Solutions and the International Erosion Control Association (IECA), participants will gain an understanding of factors that influence coastal ecological degradation. Increase awareness of nature-based solutions and how they can be implemented in coastal restoration. Additionally, attendees will gain an understanding of the ecosystem services approach to sustainable coast restoration. 

    Wisconsin’s Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscapes are imperiled. A combination of anthropogenic and natural forces have contributed to a marked decline in Lake Michigan water quality, wildlife habitat, and overall ecological value – with a sharp increase in degradation of these systems in the past decade. This webinar will discuss some of the current challenges facing landowners and land managers in the Central and Southern Coastal Ecological Landscapes of Wisconsin, along with a discussion of some pragmatic “nature-based” restoration options, with a focus on the wise use of native vegetation.

    Presented By: Clayton Frazer

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    Clayton Frazer

    Senior Ecologist

    Eco-Resource Consulting, Inc. (ERC)

    Clay received his Bachelor of Science in Zoology/Wildlife Ecology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 1996.  Following a two-year Peace Corps Volunteer post in West Africa working in the agro-forestry sector, he began his professional career as a Wildlife Technician for The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  This work led to a position with Pheasants Forever in Southeast Wisconsin as a Grassland Ecologist where he facilitated more than 6,000 acres of private land prairie and wetland restorations, including development and management of a statewide prescribed fire program.  In 2008, Clay entered the private consulting sector as a Restoration Ecologist and in 2012, Clay accepted a position as a Senior Ecologist with Eco-Resource Consulting, Inc. (ERC).  Since this time Clay has developed his skills in the areas of native plant ecology, invasive species management, stream restoration, wetland mitigation and delineation, urban stormwater management, erosion control, project planning/design and monitoring and reporting. Through the design and implementation of adaptive management approaches, Clay has accrued over 20 years of “hands-on” knowledge base in native plant community management and now leads  business and new market development at ERC.   

    This webinar is worth One (1) Professional Development Hour. 

    • Register
      • Non member - Free!
      • Professional member - Free!
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - Free!
      • Young Professional member - Free!
      • Emeritus member - Free!
      • Discounted Professional member - Free!
      • Australia Member - Free!
      • Australia Non-Member - Free!
    • More Information
  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 2022/08/04

    Healthy soil is the foundation of all civilizations. One of the most diverse habitats on earth—and one of the planet’s largest reservoirs of carbon—healthy soil is crucial for clean and abundant water supplies, and a stable climate. As Franklin Delano Roosevelt once said, “The nation that destroys its soil, destroys itself.” This webinar series looks at innovative ways to build soil health for long term sustainability.

    Sustainable Soil Health Through Innovation 

    Healthy Soils webinar

    Healthy soil is the foundation of all civilizations. One of the most diverse habitats on earth—and one of the planet’s largest reservoirs of carbon—healthy soil is crucial for clean and abundant water supplies, and a stable climate. As Franklin Delano Roosevelt once said, “The nation that destroys its soil, destroys itself.” This webinar series looks at innovative ways to build soil health for long-term sustainability.

    On-Demand

    We Need to Stop Treating Soil like Dirt - Available On-Demand

    Presenter: Alison Price, Managing Director, SoilCyclers

    Recycling is a good thing, it keeps garbage out of landfill, reduces the need for virgin materials, and reduces the cost of energy to transform base materials into usable products. Whilst most of the environmental debate centres around our disposable lifestyles, we continue to be bombarded with “greenwash” with no real solutions. Soil is known as the “factory of life”. Our economy and society depend on the health of our soil. Not only does it support plant life for food, but it also produces the fibres we use for clothing, maintains the quality and supply of our water, and can act as carbon storage. One teaspoon of high-quality soil contains billions of bacteria; a storehouse for potential antibiotics of the future. What is profoundly disturbing however is that for all our reliance on soil, it is not considered a renewable resource even though it can take over 500 years to generate just one inch of topsoil. Today, we dump millions of tonnes of soil in landfill every year and no one is asking the simple question, why? A drive down the coastline of Queensland and New South Wales shows the devastating effect of the recent floods. Once pristine farmland has been destroyed, stripped topsoil is prevalent, rivers are full of silt and distraught communities are wondering how to make ends meet. So, what do we need? 

    Using Innovative Beneficial Microbe Technology to Increase Soil Carbon for Successful Rehabilitation and Erosion Control

    Presenter: Paul J. Storer, Consultant microbiologist and Director of R&D, Troforte Innovations

    Plants and beneficial soil microbes can benefit from each other and work synergistically to help each other survive and thrive. Plants for example provide the microbes with carbon sugars derived from photosynthesis, and these carbon sugar exudates are a preferred food source of microbes. In exchange for these carbon sugars, the microbes provide essential nutrients (and water) back to the plants.

    The key to working with Microbes in any revegetation/rehabilitation project and in any soil Is to condition the soil so beneficial microbes can thrive. In this presentation, we will discuss how we have developed regenerative rehabilitation programs and learned to take a slightly different approach to conventional agronomy - where their focus is primarily on the physical and chemical properties of soil and on adjusting pH to ~6.5(+/-) - so that water soluble fertilisers can feed plant available NPK directly to the establishing plants. This conventional approach often requires large inputs of soil conditioners like Lime, Gypsum, and Compost to correct and adjust pH, flush sodium, etc. This approach can be expensive and in our opinion can increase the potential risks of failure - particularly if you do not get the rains in a timely fashion that activates these types of soil conditioners. Maintenance can also become expensive and very time consuming.

    Sustainable, Maintenance-Free Growth in Poor Quality Topsoil

    Presenter: Paul Clarke, B.Sc (Eng), MIEAust, CPEng (Retired) Managing Director, Valley Hydramulch & Revegetation

    How do we get the grass established and maintain growth the way we want it to? What can be done to establish sustainable growth without reworks? These are two questions that most project managers are faced with, to determine if the methodology they are using will meet the requirements of practical completion on large-scale projects with poor quality topsoils. The simple solution is to use a product that is tailored to the site conditions. This is achieved by testing the soil to determine the requirements and incorporating these into the grassing application.

    These applications are designed to ameliorate the soils in-situ, addressing the deficiencies in the soil, and providing the nutrients required to kickstart germination and sustain growth over longer periods. Except for extended dry periods, these applications are maintenance-free, laying dormant until adequate rainfall arrives, as well as ameliorating with the top-down approach. This allows for nutrients to penetrate through the soil profile as the root systems develop. But why can’t you use a standard application you ask?

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    Hosted by:

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    Alison Price

    Managing Director

    SoilCyclers

    I'm the Founder and Managing Director of SoilCyclers, mobile soil recycling, decontamination, amelioration and waste reduction contractors working across the construction, waste and mining industries. SoilCyclers is on a mission to create a bigger future with a smaller footprint by transforming waste into safe, reusable materials.

    Each year, I oversee recycling projects on more than 50 sites, recycling up to half a million cubic metres of material, saving clients more than $5 million, taking almost 30,000 truckloads off local roads and reducing greenhouse gas emissions by around 6000 tons.

    I am also a board member for Austmine and the Waste Recycling Industry Association of Queensland (WRIQ), and former Director and Vice Chair of the National Association of Women In Construction (NAWIC).

    Paul Storer

    Consultant microbiologist and Director of R&D

    Troforte Innovations

    Paul is the director of Research and Development and a Senior Soil Microbiologist, Plant Physiologist, Agricultural Consultant, Rehabilitation Specialist, Innovator and Educator.

    With more than 40 years’ research, publications and field experience studying the link between soil biology, Soil health and mineral nutrition in plants - Paul has been instrumental in helping investigate and develop the mineral/microbe farming system and innovative Regenerative programs and technologies to rehabilitate depleted and disrupted soils. Key to the success of this system and programs is the increase in Nutrient Use Efficiency, Water Use Efficiency, improvement in Soil Carbon (driven primarily through growing soil microbial biomass, carbon sequestration and CO2 / methane emissions reduction, biochar etc) and ultimately improving Soil Health.

    Paul Clarke

    Managing Director

    Valley Hydramulch & Revegetation

    Degree in Civil Engineering, University of Newcastle1970

    Completed Coursework for Master Eng Sc (Environmental Engineering) 1976

    MIE Aust NPER 3 Civil and Structural Colleges

    Principal of Civil Engineering Consulting Practice 1976 to Present

    Manager/Owner of Valley Hydramulch & Revegetation since 1981

    IECA member since 2010

    Education Presenter at IECA Conferences since 2015

    This program offers 3 Professional Development Hours. Each webinar is worth 1 Professional Development Hour.

    • Register
      • Non member - $40
      • Professional member - $15
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - $15
      • Young Professional member - $15
      • Emeritus member - $15
      • Discounted Professional member - $15
      • Australia Member - $15
      • Australia Non-Member - $40
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  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Members Only Benefit: IECA offers 1 PDH credit for members that complete the Environmental Connection Magazine Content Quiz.

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    IECA members have the opportunity to earn one (1) Professional Development Hour per Environmental Connection Magazine (4 per year) by completing the quarterly Environmental Connection Magazine Quiz. You're already reading Environmental Connection, so why not get the extra credits? For a digital copy of the current issue, please visit: http://www.ieca.org/archives 

    This quiz is for the 3rd Quarter 2022 edition. Once you have read the entire magazine, complete the quiz with a 70% or better to receive your credit.

    At the completion of this quiz you will receive 1 Professional Development Hour of credit. For any questions on continuing education credit, please contact IECA Education at education@ieca.org

    • Register
      • Professional member - Free!
      • Professional Plus member - Free!
      • Professional Plus Org member - Free!
      • Student member - Free!
      • Young Professional member - Free!
      • Emeritus member - Free!
      • Discounted Professional member - Free!
      • Australia Member - Free!
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