Stormwater Management on Construction Sites Package

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    • Non member - $250
    • Professional member - $225
    • Professional Plus member - $225
    • Professional Plus Org member - $225
    • Student member - $225
    • Young Professional member - $225
    • Emeritus member - $225
    • Discounted Professional member - $225
    • Australasia Member - $225

The primary stormwater pollutant at construction sites, is sediment.  The management of stormwater on a construction site is important to stay in compliance! This package five (5) stormwater management courses will provide you the tools write, review and implement a stormwater pollution prevention plan, understand stormwater runoff, look at the sediment control process analytically, and put the best plan in place for your site. 

Courses: 

  • Stormwater Runoff (1 PDH)
  • A Different Way of Looking at Sediment Control (2 PDH)
  • How to Write and Implement a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (3 PDH)
  • Implementing a SWPP - Easy Right? (2 PDH)
  • Stormwater Management Pond Muck - Costly Waste or Valuable Resource? (1 PDH)

Course Level: Intermediate

At the completion of all five (5) courses you will receive 9 Professional Development Hours of credit. For any questions on continuing education credit, please contact IECA Education at education@ieca.org

  • How to Write and Implement a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)

    Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Have you found yourself struggling with designing or reviewing a SWPPP that really works? Have you been a part of a project in the past where the SWPPP was never properly implemented? If so, this course is for you.

    Have you found yourself struggling with designing or reviewing a SWPPP that really works?   Have you been a part of a project in the past where the SWPPP was never properly implemented?   Then you understand already the need for a document which is field ready, and cohesive.  The primary stormwater pollutant at construction sites, is sediment.   To control and manage this pollutant, you need a good set of directions.  These directions, are most effectively conveyed in a dynamic, well designed series of documents called a SWPPP (StormWater Pollution Prevention Plan).  In order to design and develop a document like this effectively, it is important to follow some basic steps.   In addition, it helps to further synthesize this development process with real – site specific complications.   This design protocol makes your SWPPP unique and more effective than the typical “off the shelf templates” which haven’t been developed with a specific site and it’s dynamic conditions in mind.  This course, when complete; will provide the user with a series of concrete steps to integrate within their next SWPPP design or SWPPP review.  Whether you have never designed a SWPPP before, or done many – this course is for you.  

    Traditionally this industry has focused on documents for environmental compliance that do not appeal to the average professional on a construction site.  The key strategy remains, “How does a professional designer create a SWPPP that is both environmentally compliant and gets properly installed during the project phases?”  The fundamental steps in designing a SWPPP will follow the industry’s guidelines and integrate techniques that make the SWPPP useable on any construction project.  By following a few critical steps, fundamental to success, the course participants will be exposed to key strategies and useful tips for designing a SWPPP that really works.   Further, participants will learn to properly integrate practices,  which will be emphasized along with cost comparisons for achieving environmentally compliant projects.  If you design, inspect, install, or review Construction SWPPP Plans; then this course is for you.

    • Module 1 brings the participant through a series of fundamental steps to begin SWPPP design.  Often overlooked; these steps include site design, site assessment, and risk analysis.  This step, if overlooked, can mean the difference between a good SWPPP and one which is never implemented.
    • Module 2 resumes with typical grading practices.  The course participants will learn about fundamental site access controls, perimeter management techniques and conclude with typical dewatering and slope protection analysis.
    • Module 3 will highlight sediment management techniques involving channels and inlet devices.  These steps along with previous modules allow the participant to effectively manage the whole project learning about dynamic changes and how to properly articulate them to the construction professional on site.
    • Module 4 concludes the course with the often forgotten specific of risk analysis, documentation, permanent Stormwater practices, pollution prevention, and site signage.   These steps, combined with previous modules best prepares the participant for the fundamentals behind a good SWPPP, able to be used on a site effectively.

    Learning Objectives: 

    1. Recognize the basic science of Erosion and Sedimentation, and the thought process behind design and implementation of a proper SWPPP 
    2. Use Best Management Practices for SWPPP Development and Construction Site Erosion and Sediment Control Implementation
    3. Develop an understanding of stormwater runoff management and erosion and sediment control Best Management Practices
    4. Demonstrate and understanding of Best Management Practices and the processes of erosion and sedimentation
    5. Apply the understanding of risk analysis and site assessment to the development of a site specific SWPPP

    Course Level: Intermediate

    Jennifer Hildebrand, , CPESC,CPSWQ, CESSWI, CISEC

    Jennifer Hildebrand, CPESC, CPSWQ, CESSWI, CISEC has been involved in the erosion and sediment industry for over 18 years. She has a master’s degree in Business Administration from Augsburg College, and specializes in compliance strategies within the stormwater market. She is a registered Certified Professional in Erosion and Sediment Control and a registered Certified Professional in Stormwater Quality. She is a registered Certified Erosion, Sediment, and Stormwater Inspector. She is also a Certified Inspector for Sediment and Erosion Control. Currently employed by Weis Builders, Jennifer's experience and industry involvement allow WSB to deliver excellence in environmental compliance to their clients. Her specialties include stormwater compliance issues, training and awareness programs, site inspection programs, compliance program design, and site plan reviews. She has developed and delivered education and compliance programs in both the construction and post construction stormwater market. Her involvement in the construction industry has provided her with valuable experience in a wide variety of stormwater compliance products and services. As a result, Jennifer has developed a selection of technologies that involve several methods of hydraulic application techniques and biotechnical stabilization practices throughout the United States and Canada. This private industry experience and public representation experience provides opportunities for facilitation of appropriate stormwater, erosion, sediment, control programs and techniques. In addition, this experience also illuminates the challenges and opportunities that exist in post construction phases of stormwater compliance. Jennifer has gained valuable insight into the realities of land development, commerce, and environmental impacts in the stormwater industry as a result of her involvement with these non-profit entities, as well as the private sector of this business. Among these organizations she has given numerous presentations on proper management practices, installation techniques, full day programs on erosion and sediment control practices, along with numerous product specific presentations. Her presentations and classes have been conducted in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Illinois, Wisconsin, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, Tennessee, and New Mexico.

    At the completion of this course you will receive 3 Professional Development Hour of credit. For any questions on continuing education credit, please contact IECA Education at education@ieca.org

  • Implementing a SWPPP - Easy Right?

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 2017/06/24

    The design is complete, the permits have been obtained, and contracts are in place for contractors. It’s time to get construction started! What could possibly go wrong?

    The design is complete, the permits have been obtained, and contracts are in place for contractors. It’s time to get construction started! What could possibly go wrong?

    A SWPPP, stormwater pollution prevention plan, is a best guess about how the construction site will begin, progress and finish based upon the information that the design has before construction. However, it is rare that construction progresses as the designer envisioned. When implementing a SWPPP, expect to encounter the following:

    -           The contractor will have a different – and possibly better – way of grading the site, along with a different construction sequence.
    -           The unforeseen will be uncovered and it will impact the construction schedule.
    -           Not all parties on the construction site will agree on E&SC or stormwater management for the site.

    When implementing the SWPPP, the inspector/site manager must adapt to these issues while still meeting the intent of all permits.

    SWPPP modifications. There is no perfect SWPPP. All SWPPPs will need revision and modification during construction. Some states do not require that plans be resubmitted when modifications are required. Other states do require plan submittal and approval. Know your state’s requirements – and any professional requirements. In most states, professional engineers are the only people licensed to design pipes and embankments (think sediment basins and culverts). The SWPPP must reflect what’s on the ground and vice versa. For example, when silt fence or check dams are removed when they are no longer needed, the SWPPP should be modified to show that these measures have been removed. Inspection documentation should also indicate that the measures have been removed and why they were removed. Together, the modified SWPPP and inspection documentation should clearly tell the story of the site conditions at the time of the inspections. Take photos of the site as well to confirm site conditions.

    Documentation. As the SWPPP is revised or modified, document the changes on the SWPPP sheets, in inspection reports and with photos. Documentation is critical to show compliance. The construction general permit allows time for a contractor/developer to respond to problems found on a construction site, and if the problems are resolved within that timeframe, the site is in compliance. Note that some states have additional regulations governing construction sites and off-site sedimentation can be considered a violation of the regulation, regardless of storm size.

    Besides SWPPP modification and inspection reports, a site manager/inspector must also keep good documentation of rain events. The Construction General Permit requires that measures be designed for the 2yr, 24hr rain event. To determine the return interval for each storm, document the time a storm started and ended and the depth of rain. That information can be compared to rainfall information provided on NOAA’s Atlas 14 Point Precipitation Frequency Estimates website (https://hdsc.nws.noaa.gov/hdsc/pfds/pfds_map_cont.html) to determine the storm’s return interval. Site managers/inspectors should use the rainfall data to make decisions about the failed measures. If measures failed in a storm that exceeded the 2 year storm equivalent intensity, the measures were adequate and should be reinstalled. If measures failed in a storm that was less than or equal to the 2 year storm event, the measures should be upgraded. can be compared to the rain fall information on NOAA’s Atlas 13 site to determine the equivalent intensity storm.

    As a final good practice on a construction site, provide feedback to the designer about the site: what worked well, what didn’t work well. If that information is not conveyed to the designer, the same issues may occur on other construction sites. 

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    Course Level: All

    Beth McLaughlin

    Beth has more than 30 years of experience in stormwater management, including construction site inspections and SWPPP implementation. Her additional experience includes MS4 program policy and compliance strategy development, training, and permit negotiation. She has worked for state and county governments and provides consulting to municipalities and private agencies throughout the southeast.

  • Stormwater Runoff

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This course explores the critical factors in measuring and assessing stormwater runoff. Topics addressed are: assessment of runoff curve numbers, and applying and calculating that curve number for your construction site.

    This course explores the critical factors in measuring and assessing stormwater runoff. Topics addressed are: assessment of runoff curve numbers, and applying and calculating that curve number for your construction site.


    Course Level: All

    Mike Chase, CPESC, CPSWQ, CESSWI

    Michael Chase graduated from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo where the philosophy is “Learn by Doing”. Michael is well known in the construction and water quality industries. He has over 25 years experience in erosion and sediment control, and is a Certified Professional in Erosion and Sediment Control (CPESC), a Certified Professional in Storm Water Quality (CPSWQ), and a Certified Erosion Sediment and Storm Water Inspector (CESSWI). Michael is also a Water Quality/Filtration Specialist and has designed and developed treatment systems and filtration equipment to remove contaminants from water and other fluids. He has written Storm Water Pollutions Prevention Plans (SWPPPs), DOT Water Pollution Control Programs (WPCPs), and post construction Water Quality Management Plans (WQMPs) for construction activities, taken care of permitting associated with construction activities, designed stabilization measures, and he has conducted site inspections as well as site training for his clients nationwide. Michael is the Immediate Past President on the Board of Directors for the International Erosion Control Association (IECA), and is a 2-term Past President of the Western Chapter of the International Erosion Control Association (WCIECA).

    At the completion of this course you will receive 1 Professional Development Hour of credit. For any questions on continuing education credit, please contact IECA Education at education@ieca.org

  • A Different Way of Looking at Sediment Control on Construction Sites

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This course discusses the effects of stormwater runoff volume and rates on the performance of temporary sediment control BMPs on construction site.

    Has your BMP failed and you don’t know why? Do you feel like you are checking off the BMP box without a full grasp of the science behind the BMP placement? This course discusses the effects of stormwater runoff volume and rates on the performance of temporary sediment control BMPs on construction site. Many times, it is determined that the BMP was the cause of a failure. In reality, the BMP failure was caused by stormwater runoff in excess of the BMPs capacity, this failure could have been identified during the design process. This course will look at topography, soil type and geographic location and how you can use this information to predict the effectiveness of design for your construction site.

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    Course Level: Intermediate

    Thomas W. Schneider, CPESC

    As Head of Storm Water Compliance at Stormcon, L.L.C., Tom Schneider brings 28 years of experience and extensive training in storm water regulations focusing on construction site erosion and sediment control. Mr. Schneider works directly with local, state, and federal agencies as well as working one on one with clients to develop and implement storm water programs that will fit their needs. In the past, Mr. Schneider has been invited to testify in front of congressional subcommittees in regard to NPDES issues.

    At the completion of this course you will receive 2 Professional Development Hours of credit. For any questions on continuing education credit, please contact IECA Education at education@ieca.org

  • Stormwater Management Pond Muck – Costly Waste or Valuable Resource?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    SWM ponds require routine sediment removal in order to maintain stormwater quality and quantity control.

    SWM ponds require routine sediment removal in order to maintain stormwater quality and quantity control. Sediments typically contain common urban contaminants (e.g. petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), road salt, etc.) which trigger non-hazardous waste disposal requirements. Landfill tipping fees can amount to hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars per pond. This webinar presents two recent sediment beneficial use case studies. These studies demonstrate how ecotoxicity tests and risks assessments allowed the sediments to be used as topsoil amendments as cost effective and environmentally sustainable alternatives to landfill disposal. These studies set the precedent for future SWM pond sediment beneficial use projects as well.

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    Learning Objectives:

    1. Understanding SWM pond sediment chemistry
    2. Understanding the disposal versus beneficial use evaluation process
    3. Lessons learned from the first 2 SWM pond sediment beneficial use projects in Canada

    Course Level: All


    Francine Kelly-Hooper, Ph.D.

    Dr. Francine Kelly-Hooper is a Senior Soils Scientist with over 20 years of experience in the government and private consulting sectors. Francine operated her research based consulting firm, Kelly Hooper Environmental, for 16 years before joining CH2M HILL in 2014. She is now an Environmental Contaminant Scientist at Stantec Consulting. Francine completed her PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2013, where she developed a new method for identifying petroleum hydrocarbon sources in soils and sediments. Over the past 18 years, she has compiled sediment chemistry profiles for 120 SWM ponds.  Francine and her team continue to work with municipalities and governments on the development of a new approach to SWM sediment beneficial use evaluations.